programma Letteratura inglese III 15 marzo 2014

Letteratura inglese III 2013-14  (last updated 10th March 2014)

Journeys and Islands in British Literature

We shall work on some of the most famous and still most widely read prose works of the British canonical tradition. By referring to the category of ‘novel’, we shall start with Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe, and later move on to Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels, with the discourses on journeys, islands and empire well in our minds.

The course will later focus upon the adaptations, reductions, manipulations of these essential topical texts, written for an adult readership but eventually also and mainly read by children. Late Victorian and Edwardian fantasy literature and theatre offer the equally famous cases of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens, in which real/probable geographical locations are programmatically transformed into utopian, fantastic sites of unforeseen possibilities.

BIBLIOGRAFIA

Parte istituzionale. Uno dei seguenti manuali:

Andrew Sanders, The Short Oxford History of English Literature, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1994 (cap. 5, 6, 7, 8)

Ronald Carter,John McRae, The Routledge History of Literature in English: Britain and Ireland, pp. 117-318 (BAU)

Pat Rogers, The Oxford Illustrated History of English Literature, chapters, 5, 6, 7, 8

Michael Alexander, A History of English Literature, Basingstoke, Palgrave Macmillan, 2007 (more elementary, less advisable)

Testi primari

D. Defoe, The Life and Strange Surprising Adventures of Robinson Crusoe, 1719 qualsiasi edizione

J. Swift, Gulliver’s Travels: Based on the 1726 Text: Contexts: Criticism, ed. by A. J. Rivero, New York-London, Norton, 2002

L. Carroll, The Annotated Alice: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland; and, Through the Looking Glass, London, Allen Lane, 2000

J. M. Barrie, Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens; Peter and Wendy, ed. by P. Hollindale, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1999

Bibliografia critica

J. Richetti, THE CAMBRIDGE COMPANION TO DEFOE (2008), (cap. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7,9, 10)

C. Fox (ed.) THE CAMBRIDGE COMPANION TO SWIFT (2003), CAPP. 3, 5, 6, 7, 12

C. H. Flynn, The Body in Swift and Defoe, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1990 capp. 3, 4, 7, 8 BAU

Other texts on the specific issues:

  • D. Defoe, The Life and Strange Surprising Adventures of Robinson Crusoe. Two of the following essays (MUSE)

 

1. Maximillian E. Novak,  The Cave and the Grotto: Realist Form and Robinson Crusoe’s Imagined Interiors Eighteenth Century Fiction, Volume 20, Number 3, Spring 2008, pp. 445-468

2. Wolfram Schmidgen, “Robinson Crusoe, Enumeration, and the Mercantile Fetish”, Eighteenth-Century Studies, Volume 35, Number 1, Fall 2001, pp. 19-39

3. Ann Van Sant, “Crusoe’s Hands”, Eighteenth-Century Life, Volume 32, Number 2, Spring 2008, pp. 120-137

4. Lynn Festa, “Crusoe’s Island of Misfit Things”, The Eighteenth Century, Volume 52, Numbers 3-4, Fall/Winter 2011, pp. 443-471

 

 

  • Gulliver’s Travels: Based on the 1726 Text.  Two of the following essays:

 

  1. Clement Hawes, “Three Times Round the Globe: Gulliver and Colonial Discourse”, Cultural Critique, No. 18 (Spring, 1991), pp. 187-214
  2. Ian Higgins, “Swift and Sparta: The Nostalgia of Gulliver’s Travels”, The Modern Language Review, Vol. 78, No. 3 (Jul., 1983), pp. 513-531
  3. Ann Cline Kelly, “After Eden: Gulliver’s (Linguistic) Travels”, ELH, Vol. 45, No. 1 (Spring, 1978), pp. 33-54
  4. Laura Brown, “Reading Race and Gender: Jonathan Swift”, Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 23, No. 4, Special Issue: The Politics of Difference (Summer, 1990), pp. 425-443 (jstor)
  5. Michael J. Franklin, “Lemuel Self-Translated; Or, Being an Ass in Houyhnhnmland”, The Modern Language Review, Vol. 100, No. 1 (Jan., 2005), pp. 1-19

 

  • L. Carroll, The Annotated Alice: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland  tutti I seguenti saggi

 

  1.  J. R. Kincaid, “Alice’s Invasion of Wonderland”, PMLA, vol. 88, no. 1, 92-99
  2. Carina Garland, “Curious Appetites: Food, Desire, Gender and Subjectivity in Lewis Carroll’s Alice Texts”, The Lion and the Unicorn, Volume 32, Number 1, January 2008, pp.22-39
  3. Jennifer Geer, “All sorts of pitfalls and surprises”: Competing Views of Idealized Girlhood in Lewis Carroll’s Alice Books”, Children’s Literature, Volume 31, 2003, pp. 1-24
  4. U. C. Knoepflmacher, “Little Girls without Their Curls: Female Aggression in Victorian Children’s Literature”, Children’s Literature, Volume 11, 1983, pp. 14-31
  5. U. C. Knoepflmacher, Ventures into Childland. Victorians, Fairy Tales and Feminity, Chicago, U chicago Press, 2000 (1998), chapters 5, 6

 

  • J. M. Barrie, Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens; Peter and Wendy tutti I seguenti
  1. James R. Kinkaid (2003) “Loving Peter Pan”, Youth Theatre Journal, 17:1, 102-108
  2. M. Stoddard Holmes, “Peter Pan and the Possibilities of Child Literature” in Alison Kavey et Lester D. Friedman (ed.), Second Star to the Right: Peter Pan in the Popular Imagination, New Brunswick, N.J., Rutgers University Press, pp. 132-150
  3. Jacqueline Rose, “Introduction”,in The Case of Peter Pan, Or, The Impossibility of Children’s Fiction, (London: Macmillan, 1984): pp. 1-11

 

Non-attending students

P. Parrinder, Nation and Novel The English Novel from Its Origins to the Present Day, Oxford University Press, 2008 (also available as ebook)

5 CFU

BIBLIOGRAFIA

Parte istituzionale

Andrew Sanders, The Short Oxford History of English Literature, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1994 (cap. 5, 6, 7, 8)

Ronald Carter,John McRae, The Routledge History of Literature in English: Britain and Ireland, pp. 117-318 (BAU)

Pat Rogers, The Oxford Illustrated History of English Literature, chapters, 5, 6, 7, 8

Michael Alexander, A History of English Literature, Basingstoke, Palgrave Macmillan, 2007 (more elementary, less advisable)

 

Testi primari

D. Defoe, The Life and Strange Surprising Adventures of Robinson Crusoe, 1719 qualsiasi edizione

J. Swift, Gulliver’s Travels: Based on the 1726 Text: Contexts: Criticism, ed. by A. J. Rivero, New York-London, Norton, 2002

  • D. Defoe, The Life and Strange Surprising Adventures of Robinson Crusoe. All the following essays (MUSE)

1. Maximillian E. Novak,  The Cave and the Grotto: Realist Form and Robinson Crusoe’s Imagined Interiors Eighteenth Century Fiction, Volume 20, Number 3, Spring 2008, pp. 445-468

2. Wolfram Schmidgen, “Robinson Crusoe, Enumeration, and the Mercantile Fetish”, Eighteenth-Century Studies, Volume 35, Number 1, Fall 2001, pp. 19-39

3. Ann Van Sant, “Crusoe’s Hands”, Eighteenth-Century Life, Volume 32, Number 2, Spring 2008, pp. 120-137

4. Lynn Festa, “Crusoe’s Island of Misfit Things”, The Eighteenth Century, Volume 52, Numbers 3-4, Fall/Winter 2011, pp. 443-471

 

  • Gulliver’s Travels: Based on the 1726 Text.  All the following essays:
  1. Clement Hawes, “Three Times Round the Globe: Gulliver and Colonial Discourse”, Cultural Critique, No. 18 (Spring, 1991), pp. 187-214
  2. Ian Higgins, “Swift and Sparta: The Nostalgia of Gulliver’s Travels”, The Modern Language Review, Vol. 78, No. 3 (Jul., 1983), pp. 513-531
  3. Ann Cline Kelly, “After Eden: Gulliver’s (Linguistic) Travels”, ELH, Vol. 45, No. 1 (Spring, 1978), pp. 33-54
  4. Laura Brown, “Reading Race and Gender: Jonathan Swift”, Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 23, No. 4, Special Issue: The Politics of Difference (Summer, 1990), pp. 425-443 (jstor)
  5. Michael J. Franklin, “Lemuel Self-Translated; Or, Being an Ass in Houyhnhnmland”, The Modern Language Review, Vol. 100, No. 1 (Jan., 2005), pp. 1-19

 

4 CFU

BIBLIOGRAFIA

Parte istituzionale

Andrew Sanders, The Short Oxford History of English Literature, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1994 (cap. 5, 6, 7, 8)

Ronald Carter,John McRae, The Routledge History of Literature in English: Britain and Ireland, pp. 117-318 (BAU)

Pat Rogers, The Oxford Illustrated History of English Literature, chapters, 5, 6, 7, 8

Michael Alexander, A History of English Literature, Basingstoke, Palgrave Macmillan, 2007 (more elementary, less advisable)

Testi primari

D. Defoe, The Life and Strange Surprising Adventures of Robinson Crusoe, 1719 qualsiasi edizione

J. Swift, Gulliver’s Travels: Based on the 1726 Text: Contexts: Criticism, ed. by A. J. Rivero, New York-London, Norton, 2002  qualsiasi edizione

  • D. Defoe, The Life and Strange Surprising Adventures of Robinson Crusoe. All the following essays (MUSE)

1. Maximillian E. Novak,  The Cave and the Grotto: Realist Form and Robinson Crusoe’s Imagined Interiors Eighteenth Century Fiction, Volume 20, Number 3, Spring 2008, pp. 445-468

2. Wolfram Schmidgen, “Robinson Crusoe, Enumeration, and the Mercantile Fetish”, Eighteenth-Century Studies, Volume 35, Number 1, Fall 2001, pp. 19-39

3. Ann Van Sant, “Crusoe’s Hands”, Eighteenth-Century Life, Volume 32, Number 2, Spring 2008, pp. 120-137

  • Gulliver’s Travels: Based on the 1726 Text.  All the following essays:
  1. Clement Hawes, “Three Times Round the Globe: Gulliver and Colonial Discourse”, Cultural Critique, No. 18 (Spring, 1991), pp. 187-214
  2. Ian Higgins, “Swift and Sparta: The Nostalgia of Gulliver’s Travels”, The Modern Language Review, Vol. 78, No. 3 (Jul., 1983), pp. 513-531
  3. Ann Cline Kelly, “After Eden: Gulliver’s (Linguistic) Travels”, ELH, Vol. 45, No. 1 (Spring, 1978), pp. 33-54
  4. Laura Brown, “Reading Race and Gender: Jonathan Swift”, Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 23, No. 4, Special Issue: The Politics of Difference (Summer, 1990), pp. 425-443 (jstor)

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